What types of Employee Rights cases do you handle?

I have handled cases for discrimination, age discrimination, and discrimination based on sexual orientation. I’m certainly available to handle employee rights cases based on sexual harassment, hostile work environment. Unfortunately, that is still very prevalent. We think we’re making progress in society; we think we’re creating safe workspaces for people; but there’s an imbalance in the power dynamic between employers and employees. Most of the time, employers are respectful of that dynamic, and then you have a healthy employee-employer relationship. But too often that power dynamic is taken advantage of by the employer. Those are the situations where we’re here to step in, and frankly, empower the employee.

What experience do you have with discrimination claims outside the employment context?

I had a very interesting case recently where I represented an organization called Patrick’s Cabaret. Patrick’s Cabaret is a theatrical organization whose focus is the LGBTQ community. A couple years ago, they applied for a grant from a nonprofit foundation. They didn’t get it. The following year they were going to apply again. They decided that they were going to try and get information from that organization [as to] why they didn’t get approved the first time, so they could do a better job the second time. And unbelievably, they got a voicemail message back from the person (the manager of the funds) saying, “We have a very conservative board here, and they still haven’t decided that they’re willing to fund LGBTQ organizations.”

Unfortunately for them, you can’t make that kind of discriminatory decision. So, I actually represented Patrick’s Cabaret in a Minnesota Human Rights Act claim against the foundation. We were ready, willing, and able to sue that thing out. Ultimately, we did settle it. Here’s the key to that settlement: It is not confidential. And as you might expect, most defendants require confidentiality if they’re going to settle something. But Patrick’s Cabaret was much more interested in letting the funding community know that it’s not okay to discriminate based on sexual orientation. And so, their main requirement was, “We’re willing to settle, but only if it’s a publicly available settlement.” And it was – and we actually got quite a lot of nice coverage through The Star Tribune and other publications.

The results described in the case or cases just discussed may not be indicative of the results you may obtain on a case that Aries Legal might handle for you. Litigation is by its nature a risky endeavor and the results are difficult to predict. There is no guarantee you will achieve a successful outcome.

What experience do you have with defamation claims?

I’ve actually had a few interesting cases involving defamation claims. Twice I’ve represented stockbrokers against brokerage firms who had fired them. Both times, they were fired for supposed securities violations. And both times, I was able to prove that in fact the broker did not engage in any kind of securities violation either time, and that the brokerage firms were essentially looking for excuses just to fire the person. They used the “violations” as a pretext, so those were big cases.

But I have to say the biggest case I’ve been involved in is my own personal case where I sued a former client, a former employer, for defamation. They had filed a filing with FINRA, which I believed to be misleading and false. And with the help of an attorney in town by the name of Kevin Hofman (a very good friend and I would be remiss if I didn’t give him credit) – he was my attorney and the two of us together brought a lawsuit against the company. It went to a jury trial and we had quite a significant victory after a one-week jury trial.

The results described in the case or cases just discussed may not be indicative of the results you may obtain on a case that Aries Legal might handle for you. Litigation is by its nature a risky endeavor and the results are difficult to predict. There is no guarantee you will achieve a successful outcome.

Empowering Employees to Assert Their Rights